matchstickmolly:

The Eat Seasonably Calendar

yarrahs-life:

Instant reblog.

food for thought? I’m just sayin

stupidpeoplebreeding:

10 Things the Processed Food Industry Does Not Want You to KnowBy : Dr. MercolaProcessed foods are typically loaded with excess sugar, salt, unhealthful fats, preservatives and other additives.But you probably know this already. What you may not know about processed foods is the extent of the havoc they can wreak on your body, a closely guarded secret that the processed food industry doesn’t want you to know.In short, though they may taste good and be easy to prepare, when you eat processed foods you’re exchanging convenience for your health.In the featured article,1 Donna Gates, author of The Body Ecology Diet, explains 10 reasons why you might want to think twice the next time you’re tempted to eat processed foods.1. They’re Addictive and May Cause You to OvereatProcessing modifies or removes important components of food, like fiber, water and nutrients, changing the way they are digested and assimilated in your body.Unlike whole foods, which contain a mix of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, fiber and water to help you feel satisfied, processed foods stimulate dopamine, a feel-good neurotransmitter, making you feel good even though the food lacks nutrients and fiber. This artificial dopamine stimulation can lead to excessive food cravings and, ultimately, food addiction.2. They’re Linked to ObesityProcessed foods are virtually guaranteed to contain additives that are linked to obesity. This includes monosodium glutamate (MSG), high-fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners and more. Plus, refined carbohydrates like breakfast cereals, bagels, waffles, pretzels, and most other processed foods quickly break down to sugar.,This increases your insulin and leptin levels, and contribute to insulin resistance, which is the primary underlying factor of nearly every chronic disease and condition known to man, including weight gain.3. They Break Principles of Food CombiningSome nutrition and health experts, such as Wayne Pickering, believe that eating foods in certain combinations helps your body’s digestive processes to work more efficiently and absorb more nutrients. Wayne actually constructed a very useful food combining chart that can be obtained on his website. According to one such premise, eating proteins and starches together, which is common in processed foods (such as a pepperoni pizza), inhibits digestion leading to putrification of your food, acidic conditions in your blood and supports disease-causing pathogens in your gut.4. Processed Foods Lead to an Imbalanced Inner EcosystemThe microorganisms living in your digestive tract form a very important “inner ecosystem” that influences countless aspects of your health. Processed foods disrupt this system, suppressing beneficial microflora and leading to digestive problems, cravings, illnesses and chronic disease. Beneficial organisms in your gut thrive on whole, unprocessed foods.5. They’re Detrimental to Your Mood and BrainMood swings, memory problems and even depression are often the result of a heavily processed-food diet. In fact, the greatest concentration of serotonin, which is involved in mood control, depression and aggression, is found in your intestines, not your brain! Your gut and brain actually work in tandem, each influencing the other. This is why your intestinal health can have such a profound influence on your mental health, and vice versa – and why eating processed foods that can harm your gut flora can have a profoundly negative impact on your mood, psychological health and behavior.6. Processed Foods Encourage ‘Eating on the Run’Processed foods are quick and easy, making them ‘perfect’ to grab when you’re on the go. But eating on the go, or while you’re multi-tasking, can cause you to lose touch with your body’s natural signals telling you you’re full, leading to overeating and weight gain. It’s also more difficult for your body to digest properly when you’re busily engaged in other tasks.7. Nutrition Labels Can be MisleadingA processed food may be labeled ‘natural’ or ‘sugar-free,’ but that doesn’t make it healthful. For instance, the natural food label on a processed food has no standard definition and really no meaning at all. A “natural” product is meaningless as it can legally be genetically modified, full of pesticides or made with corn syrup, additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also allows processed food manufacturers to use absurdly tiny serving sizes on their labels, which can lull you into a false sense of security when it comes to determining how much of each stated nutrient or toxin, like trans fat, you’re actually consuming.8. Processed Meats Are Linked to CancerProcessed meats are those preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or the addition of chemical preservatives, which includes bacon, ham, pastrami, salami, pepperoni, hot dogs, some sausages and hamburgers (if they have been preserved with salt or chemical additives) and more. Particularly problematic are the nitrates that are added to these meats as a preservative, coloring and flavoring.The nitrates found in processed meats are frequently converted into nitrosamines, which are clearly associated with an increased risk of certain cancers. Meat cooked at high temperatures, as many processed meats often are, can also contain as many as 20 different kinds of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs for short. These substances are also linked to cancer.9. Processed Foods May Increase Your Risk of Infertility and MalnutritionBecause processed foods are stripped of nutrients your body needs, you could be eating a large number of calories but still become malnourished. In just three generations, a nutrient-deficient diet can lead to infertility, which is on the rise in the US.2 Plus, processed foods often contain genetically modified (GM) ingredients, which are also linked to reproductive problems.10. Processed Foods Lead to a Long Shelf Life, Not a Long Human LifeProcessed foods can last a long time on the shelf without going bad, thanks to their chemical cocktails of preservatives and other additives. Unfortunately, their makers put a lot of money and time into strategies to increase shelf life and create attractive packaging, with little attention put on the foods’ nutrient value or how it will actually detract from lasting health.
 
Source:http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/08/28/10-things-the-processed-food-industry-does-not-want-you-to-know/

stupidpeoplebreeding:

10 Things the Processed Food Industry Does Not Want You to Know
By : Dr. Mercola

Processed foods are typically loaded with excess sugar, salt, unhealthful fats, preservatives and other additives.

But you probably know this already. What you may not know about processed foods is the extent of the havoc they can wreak on your body, a closely guarded secret that the processed food industry doesn’t want you to know.

In short, though they may taste good and be easy to prepare, when you eat processed foods you’re exchanging convenience for your health.

In the featured article,1 Donna Gates, author of The Body Ecology Diet, explains 10 reasons why you might want to think twice the next time you’re tempted to eat processed foods.

1. They’re Addictive and May Cause You to Overeat

Processing modifies or removes important components of food, like fiber, water and nutrients, changing the way they are digested and assimilated in your body.

Unlike whole foods, which contain a mix of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, fiber and water to help you feel satisfied, processed foods stimulate dopamine, a feel-good neurotransmitter, making you feel good even though the food lacks nutrients and fiber. This artificial dopamine stimulation can lead to excessive food cravings and, ultimately, food addiction.

2. They’re Linked to Obesity

Processed foods are virtually guaranteed to contain additives that are linked to obesity. This includes monosodium glutamate (MSG), high-fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners and more. Plus, refined carbohydrates like breakfast cereals, bagels, waffles, pretzels, and most other processed foods quickly break down to sugar.,

This increases your insulin and leptin levels, and contribute to insulin resistance, which is the primary underlying factor of nearly every chronic disease and condition known to man, including weight gain.

3. They Break Principles of Food Combining

Some nutrition and health experts, such as Wayne Pickering, believe that eating foods in certain combinations helps your body’s digestive processes to work more efficiently and absorb more nutrients. Wayne actually constructed a very useful food combining chart that can be obtained on his website. According to one such premise, eating proteins and starches together, which is common in processed foods (such as a pepperoni pizza), inhibits digestion leading to putrification of your food, acidic conditions in your blood and supports disease-causing pathogens in your gut.

4. Processed Foods Lead to an Imbalanced Inner Ecosystem

The microorganisms living in your digestive tract form a very important “inner ecosystem” that influences countless aspects of your health. Processed foods disrupt this system, suppressing beneficial microflora and leading to digestive problems, cravings, illnesses and chronic disease. Beneficial organisms in your gut thrive on whole, unprocessed foods.

5. They’re Detrimental to Your Mood and Brain

Mood swings, memory problems and even depression are often the result of a heavily processed-food diet. In fact, the greatest concentration of serotonin, which is involved in mood control, depression and aggression, is found in your intestines, not your brain! Your gut and brain actually work in tandem, each influencing the other. This is why your intestinal health can have such a profound influence on your mental health, and vice versa – and why eating processed foods that can harm your gut flora can have a profoundly negative impact on your mood, psychological health and behavior.

6. Processed Foods Encourage ‘Eating on the Run’

Processed foods are quick and easy, making them ‘perfect’ to grab when you’re on the go. But eating on the go, or while you’re multi-tasking, can cause you to lose touch with your body’s natural signals telling you you’re full, leading to overeating and weight gain. It’s also more difficult for your body to digest properly when you’re busily engaged in other tasks.

7. Nutrition Labels Can be Misleading

A processed food may be labeled ‘natural’ or ‘sugar-free,’ but that doesn’t make it healthful. For instance, the natural food label on a processed food has no standard definition and really no meaning at all. A “natural” product is meaningless as it can legally be genetically modified, full of pesticides or made with corn syrup, additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also allows processed food manufacturers to use absurdly tiny serving sizes on their labels, which can lull you into a false sense of security when it comes to determining how much of each stated nutrient or toxin, like trans fat, you’re actually consuming.

8. Processed Meats Are Linked to Cancer

Processed meats are those preserved by smoking, curing or salting, or the addition of chemical preservatives, which includes bacon, ham, pastrami, salami, pepperoni, hot dogs, some sausages and hamburgers (if they have been preserved with salt or chemical additives) and more. Particularly problematic are the nitrates that are added to these meats as a preservative, coloring and flavoring.

The nitrates found in processed meats are frequently converted into nitrosamines, which are clearly associated with an increased risk of certain cancers. Meat cooked at high temperatures, as many processed meats often are, can also contain as many as 20 different kinds of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs for short. These substances are also linked to cancer.

9. Processed Foods May Increase Your Risk of Infertility and Malnutrition

Because processed foods are stripped of nutrients your body needs, you could be eating a large number of calories but still become malnourished. In just three generations, a nutrient-deficient diet can lead to infertility, which is on the rise in the US.2 Plus, processed foods often contain genetically modified (GM) ingredients, which are also linked to reproductive problems.

10. Processed Foods Lead to a Long Shelf Life, Not a Long Human Life

Processed foods can last a long time on the shelf without going bad, thanks to their chemical cocktails of preservatives and other additives. Unfortunately, their makers put a lot of money and time into strategies to increase shelf life and create attractive packaging, with little attention put on the foods’ nutrient value or how it will actually detract from lasting health.

 

Source:
http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/08/28/10-things-the-processed-food-industry-does-not-want-you-to-know/

deerhoof:

the future is here and it’s horrible

stereomindset:

tastegarden:

The Cookie Cup

what a time to be alive 

awesometriathlon:

#3 the government doesn’t give a shit that you’re unhealthy. You’re less likely to revolt when you feel like shit

awesometriathlon:

#3 the government doesn’t give a shit that you’re unhealthy. You’re less likely to revolt when you feel like shit

okramagazine:

My Maryland Food Heritage: Soul Food and Conversations with MomChamice Dill
Foodle by Megan Pendergrass
During the Fall 2012 semester at Chesapeake College in…View Post

okramagazine:

My Maryland Food Heritage: Soul Food and Conversations with Mom

Chamice Dill

Foodle by Megan Pendergrass

During the Fall 2012 semester at Chesapeake College in…

View Post

freeculturedmind:

Food for the soul

freeculturedmind:

Food for the soul

eboni-health-advisor:

The Importance of Family Dinners

Busy schedules of both parents and children make it harder to have “family dinners.” But families may not be aware of the benefits that come with regularly eating together at the table.

Research suggests that having dinner together as a family at least four times a week has positive effects on child development. Family dinners have been linked to a lower risk of obesity, substance abuse, eating disorders, and an increased chance of graduating from high school.

Conversation

Eating dinner together as a family provides the opportunity for conversation. This lets parents teach healthy communication without distractions from smart phones, television, computers, and mobile devices.

By engaging your children in conversation, you teach them how to listen and provide them with a chance to express their own opinions. This allows your children to have an active voice within the family.

Conversations at the dinner table expand the vocabulary and reading ability of children, regardless of socioeconomic status. Family dinners allow every family member to discuss his or her day and share any exciting news.

Use these tips to encourage conversation:

  • Discuss the child’s day. Express an interest in your child’s daily life.
  • Discuss current events. Bring up news that’s appropriate for your child’s age.
  • Let all family members talk. Be an active listener and be sure your child learns to listen as well.
  • Encourage your child to participate. Do not underestimate your child’s ability to hold a conversation.

Developmental Benefits

The sense of security and togetherness provided by family meals helps nurture children into healthy, well-rounded adults. Frequent family dinners have a positive impact on children’s values, motivation, personal identity, and self-esteem.

Children who eat dinner with their family are more likely to understand, acknowledge, and follow the boundaries and expectations set by their parents. A decrease in high-risk behaviors is related to the amount of time spent with family—especially during family dinners.

To make the most of your family mealtime, follow these guidelines:

  • Turn off television, radio, mobile devices, etc., during dinner.
  • Have family dinners at least four or five times a week.
  • Enjoy positive conversation during the meal.
  • Spend an hour eating dinner, conversing, and cleaning up together.

Nutritional Benefits

Eating dinner together as a family also encourages healthy eating habits and provides a model for children to carry with them into adulthood. Studies show family dinners increase the intake of fruits and vegetables; families who eat dinner together tend to eat fewer fried foods and drink less soda; and family meal frequency is linked to the intake of protein, calcium, and some vitamins.

Here are some mealtime suggestions:

  • Cook as a family and include everyone in the preparation process.
  • Experiment with fun recipes.
  • Remake old recipes with healthier alternatives.
  • Have “theme” cuisine nights such as Italian, Mexican, or Caribbean.
  • Know your children’s favorite meals and cook them on a rotating basis.
  • Create your own recipes.

Nightly family dinners may require effort in planning, but the benefits in mental and physical health to you and your family are more than worth it.

The benefits of family dinners also involve and include Giving and receiving constructive criticism; building social skills, building and maintaining trust and etc. We need to be doing more than eating together but praying together, eating healthier and building trust, loyalty and commitment among family members.

eboni-health-advisor.tumblr.com/archive

vanconcastiel:

thevioletsunflower:

yeachristmasyea:

SO MANY OF THE TOMATO SAUCE

He looks so done in the last gif

I’ve rebloged this 13 times and I will continue to do so for so many.

docutube:

Soul Food Junkies (2013) 1h 4min.

Food traditions are hard to change, especially when they’re passed on from generation to generation. Baffled by his dad’s unwillingness to change his traditional soul food diet in the face of a health crisis, filmmaker Byron Hurt sets out to learn more about this rich culinary tradition and its relevance to black cultural identity.

soulbrotherv2:

Black Hunger: Soul Food And America by Doris Witt
Using the history of Aunt Jemima as a springboard for researchingthe affinity between African-Americans and food, BLACK HUNGERfocuses on debates that have been waged over the term ‘soul food’since the tumultuous era of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.BLACK HUNGER looks specifically at how the association of African-American women with food has helped structure twentieth-centurypsychic, cultural, sociopolitical, and economic life in America.An association that has blossomed into a complex web of political,religious, sexual and racial tensions between Blacks and whites,and within the Black community itself.Doris Witt uses vaudeville, literature, film and cookbooks toexplore how food has been used to perpetuate and challenge racialstereotypes. Hence, the main focus is the controversy surroundingthe authenticity of soul food and stereotypical views of blackwomen in the United States. Witt fervidlyly contends that AuntJemima was not only used to sell pancakes, but also to perpetuatepost-Civil War race and gender hierarchies, including thesubordination of African-American women as servants, and whitefantasies of the nurturing mammy.  (Reviewed by The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers).  [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Black Hunger: Soul Food And America by Doris Witt

Using the history of Aunt Jemima as a springboard for researching
the affinity between African-Americans and food, BLACK HUNGER
focuses on debates that have been waged over the term ‘soul food’
since the tumultuous era of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.

BLACK HUNGER looks specifically at how the association of African-
American women with food has helped structure twentieth-century
psychic, cultural, sociopolitical, and economic life in America.
An association that has blossomed into a complex web of political,
religious, sexual and racial tensions between Blacks and whites,
and within the Black community itself.

Doris Witt uses vaudeville, literature, film and cookbooks to
explore how food has been used to perpetuate and challenge racial
stereotypes. Hence, the main focus is the controversy surrounding
the authenticity of soul food and stereotypical views of black
women in the United States. Witt fervidlyly contends that Aunt
Jemima was not only used to sell pancakes, but also to perpetuate
post-Civil War race and gender hierarchies, including the
subordination of African-American women as servants, and white
fantasies of the nurturing mammy.  (Reviewed by The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers).  [book link]

food52:

This is not a quick dish to make. It is made with time and skill and love.
Read more: BeautifulNow is Beautiful Now | Mothers’ Beautiful Soul Food

food52:

This is not a quick dish to make. It is made with time and skill and love.

Read more: BeautifulNow is Beautiful Now | Mothers’ Beautiful Soul Food